Profile: Amy Griffin

Dr. Amy L. Griffin, Lecturer, School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales-ADFA, Canberra, Australia. Amy s research interests include epidemiological modelling, and the health implications of human-environment interactions.

Amy Griffin was born and raised in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota) area in the United States. She earned her BA degree at Macalester College in St. Paul in 1997. She then moved to Pennsylvania State University, where she completed MS (2000) and PhD (2004) degrees. She then migrated to Australia, where she took up her present post. She earned a graduate certificate in university teaching and learning from the University of New South Wales in 2006.

A few of her health-related projects involve (1) Modeling environmental changes and hantavirus seroprevalence in rodents in the western United States; and (2) Multi-agent spatial modeling of equine influenza with Bahaa Eldin Aly and Hussein Abbass (UNSW-ADFA) and Peter Durr (CSIRO). The accidental introduction of equine influenza (EI) into Australia, which occurred in August 2007, had a major impact ( $1billion in direct and indirect costs) on the Australian economy. This project seeks to develop tools that will allow decision makers to consider the costs and benefits of different disease mitigation strategies early in the course of an outbreak (i.e., at a time at which there is little high-quality information on the outbreak). She is also actively researching in other areas of GIScience, such as the reconstruction of historical spatial data on armed conflict. Amy is currently Secretary/Treasurer of the GISc, Spatial Analysis and Modelling Study Group in the Institute of Australian Geographers. She has recently published health-related work in Health Place and the Proceedings of the European Colloquium on Theoretical and Quantitative Geography (2007).

Amy may be contacted at a.griffin@nulladfa.edu.au. See also http://www.unsw.adfa.edu.au/perns/research/griffin/index.html

Updated: January 2009