Profile: Douglas Wiebe

Dr. Douglas Wiebe, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Douglas research interests include environmental risk factors for injury, alcohol use and alcohol availability, the methodologic challenges of exposure measurement, and the impact of daily routines on health-related behavior.

Douglas received his bachelor s degree in psychology at the University of Calgary, his PhD from the School of Social Ecology at the University of California Irvine, and completed postdoctoral studies in injury epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of California Los Angeles.

Douglas leads a population-based case-control study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to measure the extent to which adolescents are exposed to risk and protective factors over the course of their daily activities, and investigate the impact of exposure on the likelihood of being assaulted (R01AA014944). The availability of alcohol in the community is a key risk factor in this investigation.

Douglas holds an Independent Scientist Award from the National Institutes of Health (K02AA017974). The goal of its research is to develop methodology for prospectively monitoring individuals activities to enable collection of exposure data in epidemiologic research. Doug teaches the course Geography and Health (PUBH 517) in the Masters of Public Health program at the University of Pennsylvania, and serves on the board of Directors of SAVIR (Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research). He also serves on study sections for the Center for Scientific Review at the NIH, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Doug also holds a Visiting Scholar appointment in the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge, England, where he spends time conducting research each summer.

Doug may be contacted at dwiebe@nullexchange.upenn.edu

Updated: May 2011