Profile: Jean Shoveller

Dr. Jean Shoveller, Associate Professor, School of Population and Public Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Dr. Shoveller is a leading researcher focusing on the social and institutional contexts of youth health, with a particular emphasis on investigating the impact of gender, culture and place on sexual health disparities amongst young people.

Born in Clarence, Born in Clarence, Nova Scotia, Jeannie Shoveller completed her undergraduate and masters degrees at Dalhousie University in Halifax. After working in public health for several years, she then completed a PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies at UBC in 1997. After finishing post-doctoral training in 1999, she took up her appointment at UBC, where she is currently a faculty member in UBC’s School of Population and Public Health.

She holds a CIHR/PHAC Chair in Improving Youth Sexual Health and leads a CIHR-funded research and training program focused on policy and program intervention research related to the health and social impacts of sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies amongst youth. Her research has a particular emphasis on investigating the impact of gender, culture and place on sexual health inequalities amongst young people. She has published widely on these issues (including Health Place ). She has recently completed several projects related to health geography, including a study regarding how sex, gender and place/space interact to affect young people’s access to and experiences with STI testing in urban, suburban and rural settings, including communities affected by oil and gas exploration.

Jean also serves on the Institute Advisory Board for the Institute of Population and Public Health at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. She is a member on the CIHR’s PSD/PSB Grant Review Panels and NCIC’s Health Promotion and Health Services Grant Panel (since 2001).

Jean may be contacted at jean.shoveller@nullubc.ca; see also http://www.spph.ubc.ca/bio/shovel.html

Updated: June 2008